How to make Soap, Hot Press Style – Workshop Notes

These notes are designed to follow on from my Soap Making Workshops. If you have not attended a workshop you can still read through the notes, then follow the recipe and instructions to make your own soap. Make sure you follow the recipe exactly, so all the caustic soda/ lye is used up and your soap is safe to use on your skin. Feel free to ask any questions if you’re unsure about anything.

Equipment
• Slow cooker or ‘crock pot’.

• Scales
• Bucket/suitable container for mixing.
• Measuring jugs
• A stick blender (immersion blender)
• Spatula
• Baking parchment paper
• Loaf tin or jelly moulds for soap shapes – silicone moulds are great.
• Optional Extras – essential oils to fragrance and flowers to decorate

Safety
• Wear professional safety equipment, to protect yourself when the sodium hydroxide is used – goggles, gloves and a mask are essential once you begin using the sodium hydroxide.
• Use solid stainless steel or polypropylene for mixing sodium hydroxide in.
• Ensure you are in a well ventilated space so you are not breathing in the fumes from the sodium hydroxide.
• Make the soap at a time where you will not be distracted and there are no children or pets around.
• Use the exact amounts in the recipe to ensure all the sodium hydroxide is used up when the soap is complete and ready to use (see below for how to tweak the recipe)*

Soap Recipe

  • Spring Water – 380g (do not use tap water)
  • Sodium hydroxide (caustic soda/ lye) – 137.40g
  • Olive oil – 650g (do not use pomice olive oil)
  • Shea butter – 80g (for creaminess)
  • Coconut oil (not fractionated) – 270g (for bubbles in your soap)
  • Orange essential oil – 30g
  • Calendula (marigold) petals – hand full.

Instructions
• Prepare the loaf tin or container by lining it with parchment paper – if you are using silicon moulds they won’t need lining.
• Weigh all the ingredients out.

• Put the oils & shea butter in the slow cooker first on a low heat so they gently melt.
• At this point make sure all your safety gear is on and there are no distractions, then in a separate container, add sodium hydroxide (caustic soda/ lye) to water, this causes an exothermic reaction, making the mixture heat up very quickly. Never add water to sodium hydroxide as it will be too concentrated initially and could bubble up. Because of the fumes that are produced, at this point, I often do it outside if there is a safe and suitable space. DO NOT GET THE MIXTURE ONTO YOU!
• Stir the sodium hydroxide and water, initially it appears cloudy, wait for it to become clear and then add it to the oils & shea butter in the slow cooker.
• Use the stick blender to blend everything until it leaves a ‘trace’. This means, when you drip the mixture you can still see the impression it leaves behind in the mixture.

This is the point that you would pour the soap if you were making cold pressed soap.

For hot pressed soap, you leave the mixture in the slow cooker, on a low heat with the lid on for 15-20 minutes.

Set a timer so you remember to return and check the mix.

When you return, the mixture looks like the fat has separated from the liquid. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to mix everything together again, and then leave it for another 15-20 minutes.

When you return this time, the mix looks like vaseline or apple sauce, and will have lots of air through it. Stir everything together again.

The mixture is still very hot so take care.

Turn off the heat on the slow cooker.

• You can now add in the essential oil** and blend  it evenly through the mixture (optional).
• Sprinkle calendula petals into the mixture and stir through evenly (optional) (calendula / marigold petals keep their colour when added to the mix, others usually turn brown).
• Pour into the loaf tin/ soap moulds. Decorate with dried petals (optional).
• Leave for 24 – 48 hours to allow the soap to set before cutting into slices or whatever shapes you want. If you have used silicon moulds pop the soap out.
• The soap is now ready to use.

The Science bit – the ingredients go through a chemical process called saponification to turn into soap. The acid (in this case the oils) mix with the sodium hydroxide. This usually takes between 24-48 hours but the hot process method speeds this up by keeping the mix heated and it is not necessary to cure for weeks, it is usually ready to use in 24 hours. During the saponification process glycerol is released from the fatty acids allowing them to combine with the hydroxide ions creating soap. The release of glycerol results in glycerin in the finished soap.

**Essential oils do not usually hold their therapeutic benefits in the soap making process, but they are a natural way to bring a fragrance to the soap. I usually use citrus or lavender essential oils in mine. Click to check out this interview with Robert Tisserand on what happens to essential oils in soap making.

*Recipe adjustments
If you want to adjust the recipe or design your own, then I recommend using the online tool:  Soap Calc** – this is because each ingredient has it’s own saponification value which means it will need a specific amount of sodium hydroxide in the soap. You can enter your recipe into the tool and it works out for you the correct ratio of ingredients to ensure all the sodium hydroxide is used up during the soap making process. For example if you want to replace the olive oil for apricot oil in the recipe above everything else will need adjusting to make sure the final product is safe for your skin.

Super Fat – if you hear this term, it means there is more fats and oils in the recipe than will be used in the saponification process, which means the final product leaves your skin feeling nourished and moisturised. This recipe has a super fat value, and you should notice that the soap does not dry your skin or leave it feeling stripped.

**Click here to check out this YouTube video on using the tool Soapcalc.

How to make a Lip Balm with Essential Oils

Lip Balm Recipe for 50g of product:

  • beeswax, 8g
  • shea butter, 8g
  • olive oil, 34g
  • essential oil, 3 – 5 drops
  • my favourites are:
    • peppermint (3 drops) – fresh & tingly,
    • orange (2 drops) & benzoin (2 drops) – delicious,
    • myrrh (2 drops) & mandarin (2 drops), healing,
    • spearmint (3 drops) & benzoin (1 drop) – fresh & yummy.

Equipment:

  • bain-marie or double boiler (this means a separate pan to put the butters in, on top of a pan of water, so that the oils are heated very gently by the steam from the water, rather than directly on the heat).
  • scales,
  • stirring spoon or chopstick,
  • lip balm pot or pots.

Instructions:

  • measure out the ingredients first,
  • melt the beeswax and oils in a bain-marie, add the shea butter once everything else is melted together so it doesn’t heat more than necessary.
  • add the essential oils & stir,
  • pour into a pot/pots and allow to set.
  • Secure the lid immediately to capture the volatile essential oils, and check after a while if any moisture collects in the lid, and wipe away with a tissue.

Use:

Tip: Dip your finger into the melting pot to test the consistency of the balm, it will cool and solidify very quickly so you can tell what the final product will be like. Add a little more beeswax to make a harder lip balm, and a little more liquid oil for a softer version.

How to make Soap, Cold Press Style – Workshop Notes

These notes are designed to follow on from my Soap Making Workshops. If you have not attended a workshop you can still read through the notes, then follow the recipe and instructions to make your own soap. Make sure you follow the recipe exactly, so all the caustic soda/ lye is used up and your soap is safe to use on your skin. Feel free to ask any questions if you’re unsure about anything. Please note that using the cold press method means you will have to wait 6 weeks for your soap to be ready to use. Click here for the Hot Press method which means you can use your soap within 48 hours.

Equipment
• Scales
• Bucket
• Measuring jugs
• A stick blender (immersion blender)
• Spatula
• Baking parchment paper.
• Loaf tin or jelly moulds for soap shapes – silicone moulds are great.
• Optional Extras – essential oils and flowers to decorate

Safety
• Wear professional safety equipment, to protect yourself when the sodium hydroxide (caustic soda/ lye)  is used – goggles, gloves and a mask are essential once you begin using the sodium hydroxide.
• Use solid stainless steel or polypropylene for mixing sodium hydroxide in.
• Ensure you are in a well ventilated space so you are not breathing in the fumes from the sodium hydroxide.
• Make the soap at a time where you will not be distracted and there are no children or pets around.
• Use the exact amounts in the recipe to ensure all the sodium hydroxide is used up when the soap is complete and ready to use (see below for how to tweak the recipe)*

Soap Recipe Ingredients (use exact measurements shown):

  • Spring Water – 330g (do not use tap water)
  • Sodium hydroxide (caustic soda/ lye) – 137.40g
  • Olive oil – 650g (do not use pomice olive oil)
  • Shea butter – 80g (for creaminess)
  • Coconut oil (not fractionated) – 270g (for bubbles in your soap)
  • Orange essential oil – 30g
  • Calendula (marigold) petals – hand full.

Instructions:
• Prepare the loaf tin or container by lining it with parchment paper – if you are using silicone moulds they won’t need lining.
• Weigh all the ingredients out.
• Mix the oil and butter ingredients first (melt the coconut & shea butter in a double boiler first, this means a separate pan with the butters in, on top of a pan of water, so that they are heated very gently by the steam from the water, rather than directly on the heat).
• At this point make sure all your safety gear is on and there are no distractions, then add sodium hydroxide to water and stir, this causes an exothermic reaction, making the mixture heat up very quickly. Never add water to sodium hydroxide as it will be too concentrated initially and could bubble up. Because of the fumes that are produced, at this point, I often do it outside if there is a safe and suitable space. DO NOT GET THE MIXTURE ONTO YOU!
• Initially the mix of sodium hydroxide and water is cloudy, wait for about 5 minutes for it to become clear and then combine it with the oils & shea butter.
• Blend with the stick blender to blend everything until it leaves a ‘trace’. This means, when you drip the mixture you can still see the impression it leaves behind in the mixture. Ensure you dunk the blender fully into the mix, so it doesn’t splash anywhere.
• At this point add in the essential oil** and blend a little more (optional).
• Sprinkle calendula petals into the mixture and stir through evenly (optional) (calendula / marigold petals keep their colour when added to the mix, others usually turn brown).
• Pour into the loaf tin/ soap moulds. Decorate with dried flower petals (optional).
• Leave for 24 – 48 hours to allow the soap to set before cutting into slices or whatever shapes you want. If you have used silicone moulds pop the soap out.
• Store the soap in a cool, dark, well ventilated place so it is exposed to the air and wait for 6 weeks before using. Use the Hot Press Soap Making Notes to make a soap that is ready to use in 24 hours.

The Science bit – the ingredients go through a chemical process called saponification to turn into soap. The acid (in this case the oils) mix with the sodium hydroxide. This usually takes between 24-48 hours. During the saponification process glycerol is released from the fatty acids allowing them to combine with the hydroxide ions creating soap. The release of glycerol results in glycerin in the finished soap. The soap is then left for 6 weeks to ‘cure’.

**Essential oils do not usually hold their therapeutic benefits in the soap making process, but they are a natural way to bring a fragrance to the soap. I usually use citrus or lavender essential oils in mine.

*Recipe adjustments:
If you want to adjust the recipe or design your own, then I recommend using the online tool:  Soap Calc*** – this is because each ingredient has its own saponification value which means it will need a specific amount of sodium hydroxide in the soap. You can enter your recipe into the tool and it works out for you the correct ratio of ingredients to ensure all the sodium hydroxide is used up during the soap making process. For example if you want to replace the olive oil for apricot oil in the recipe above, everything else will need adjusting to make sure the final product is safe for your skin.

Super Fat – if you hear this term, it means there is more fats and oils in the recipe than will be used in the saponification process, which means the final product leaves your skin feeling nourished and moisturised. This recipe has a super fat value, and you should notice that the soap does not dry your skin or leave it feeling stripped.

Click here to check my events page to view up and coming workshops, or get in touch to request a new workshop.

***Click here to check out this YouTube video on using the tool Soapcalc.

Face Masks and Essential Oils

If you need or feel to wear a face mask, you may like to use essential oils to enhance the experience:

  • simply drop your favourite essential oil onto the mask and enjoy the scent on your journey;
  • if you need to go out and you feel vulnerable, choose an essential oil to help with feelings of anxiety, eg. neroli or lavender.
  • use an essential oil to give your immune system a little boost, eg. tea tree or thyme.

You can either sprinkle a drop or two of the essential oil onto the mask, but be careful if the mask is precious and the essential oil has a colour to it that might stain.

Alternatively, you can use a roller ball blend of essential oils to apply to the skin above your lip and below your nose before you place your face mask on. Click here to order a blend designed to your specific needs or send an email to laura@essentialoilsandyou.co.uk with your request. The blend contains essential oils diluted in a carrier oil (I usually use apricot kernel oil as it is very gentle), so it is suitable to apply to the skin.  Note that undiluted essential oils are not suitable for skin application as they are too concentrated but they can be dropped onto the mask.

These are the most beautiful face masks I have come across, made from silk so they feel divine on your skin, designed, hand printed and hand made by Sophie Darling in Brighton, UK.

www.SophieDarling.com

Rose, Cherry and Chia Jam

Jam made with rose water, cherries and chia seeds: Inspired by the deliciously simple ‘jam’ made as part of our breakfasts at a Rose Retreat in Bulgaria last year. Our incredible chef Sarah and her partner Andreas spent a considerable amount time de-stoning fresh cherries that happen to be in season around the time of the rose retreat! 

Recipe: I made this version with some frozen cherries I had in the freezer, simply add the following to a blender*:

  • a table spoon of chia seeds,
  • a cup of cherries,
  • a table spoon of rose water,

…whizz for a minute or two. Leave to ‘set’, or more accurately, let the chia seeds absorb the moisture in the cherries (fresh or frozen will have enough water content) for about an hour leaving a slightly gloopy, jammy texture – if it’s too runny for you, add a few more chia seeds.

Ingredients: You can purchase organic rose water suitable for using in foods from my web shop here: Organic Rose Water. Alternatively, you can add rose petals from your garden to the mix, make sure they have not been sprayed with any chemical insecticides or fungicides etc. Cherries from your local fruit supplier. Chia seeds from Healthy Supplies.

Health: Suitable to support people cutting down or removing sugar from their diet, or generally wanting to eat yummy, healthy food, since you only need fruit and chia seeds – regular jam is usually made with a great deal of sugar, but the fruit alone can taste sweet enough.

Shelf life: Can be kept in the fridge and will last a few days, (the huge amount of refined sugar is what allows for the long shelf life of regular jam, but since we have freezers now, we don’t need to preserve our foods to keep us alive through winter.

Tips: Use any fruit you like in place of the cherries and the rose water is not essential but certainly gives a floral twist. You could try blackberries when they are in season with a hint of lavender water. Be aware that different fruits will have different water content, and determine how runny or thick the jam becomes, so add more chia seeds for a thicker consistency.

  • You may like to add a little sweetener for taste such as maple syrup or honey.
  • *If you don’t have a blender just mash the fruit and mix with the chia seeds.

Rose Lovers: If you love roses, you may like to find out more about a Rose Retreat, which takes place in Bulgaria at the end of May, during the rose harvest. As well as visiting fields of scented roses, a rose essential oil distillery and mineral spa, our workshops and meals are all themed around roses… and will surely include rose cherry chia jam, rose scented panna cotta, rose harissa and rose petal teas & salads!

 

Self Care For All

‘Nature’s confetti’ by David Pearce.

In any situation we face, we are always offered space to surrender and to bring focus to deeply caring and supporting ourselves.  Right now, in the midst of the corona virus outbreak, you may be considered a ‘key worker’, in which case, likely under huge pressure, or on ‘lock down’ and unable to leave your home, either way, there are many challenges at play.

Making self-care our natural way in our every day life, not only supports ourselves, but naturally then supports all of those around us – therefore there is a great responsibility in attending to this.

As you know, I love to share how essential oils can simply nourish our health and wellbeing, they can be particularly helpful for supporting the respiratory system and for moments of stress and duress, so here’s a few blogs that spring to mind with this focus in mind:

‘Autumn fire’ by David Pearce.

Click here for ‘Unimed Living’  website for more support and inspiration on bringing self-care into your natural way.

Any purchases from the web shop will come with a FREE inhaler stick until end of May 2020 (or while stocks allow). You can request the scent/blend or I can make one to suit you. Inhaler sticks are also available to purchase for just £2.50.

Click here for an informative article on Essential Oils and Coronaviruses from the Tisserand Institute.

How to make Aromatherapy Inhaler Sticks with Essential Oils

Inhalation of essential oils is the fastest method for them to be taken into and used by your body.  The inhalation method is particularly useful for treating respiratory conditions, such as colds, coughs, sinusitis, it’s also helpful for nausea, headaches and for calming feelings of stress and anxiety.

One thing of notable value is that all essential oils have, at varying degrees of potency, an anti-microbial action, often anti-viral, anti-bacterial & even insecticidal. Therefore, using an inhaler stick is a great way to help protect yourself from the plethora of bugs, viruses, colds, flus etc. that are often doing the rounds in our societies.

I tend to take them with me when I’m travelling on a plane, train or sometimes in an automobile – they are particularly useful for travel sickness too (see recipes below). They fit in your pocket, so you can take them out whenever you feel to, and they don’t tend to impose on others around you.

How to make an inhaler stick: They are incredibly simple to make, all you need is:

You can choose one or several essential oils to add to your inhaler stick, see recipe examples below. The total number of drops you add should come to 10.

How to use your inhaler stick: take the lid off, bring the stick just below your nose and take a few deep and gentle in breaths and then let your body relax and respond. You can use it as and when you feel too.

Recipe inspiration:

Clearing, (bug & germ busting):

  • eucalyptus (globulus type is strongest), peppermint, rosemary, thyme (any type), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) (you can use one or all of the oils suggested but the total no. of drops should add up to 10).

Calming (stress, anxiety, and hay fever):

  • lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), chamomile (roman), neroli (orange blossom), (you can use one or all of the oils suggested but the total no. of drops should add up to 10).

Anti-Nausea (morning sickness, travel sickness and also anxiety when it causes stomach aches):

  • spearmint, cardamom, neroli (orange blossom), (you can use one or all of the oils suggested but the total no. of drops should add up to 10).

Love Bomb – choose your favourite scent and use it just because… useful on public transport if it doesn’t smell great, if you feel distracted and want something to support returning to your body, can be comforting and supportive.

Shelf life approximately 12 months, if the scent fades and you can manage to get the cap undone, you can refresh with more drops of essential oil.

I like this company ‘Kare & Kind’ for inhalers sticks as they come in multiple colours, labels to stick on , pipettes to drop oils on with and holders to ensure you don’t get oil on your fingers.

If you have particular symptoms you would like support with, get in touch for advice on which essential oils to add to your inhaler stick, or order one to be designed & made for you (this is usually more cost effective if you don’t have your own collection of essential oils to make one with): Bespoke Inhaler Stick.

Tips:

  • Choose essential oils that you enjoy the scent of – if you like the action of the essential oil but not the smell then there is always an alternative option – e.g. if you don’t like tea tree, try lavender.
  • If you use more than one essential oil, try them on ‘scent strips’ to see how they blend together first.

Safety:

  • *when choosing essential oils ensure you are clear about any contraindications, some essential oils should be avoided with children, in pregnancy, with epilepsy, cardiac fibrillation, blood clotting disorders, ragweed allergies – check with a qualified aromatherapist for advice.

How to make Bath Salts with Essential Oils


First of all, it’s really important to know that essential oils are hydrophobic, meaning they don’t mix with water. Because essential oils are extremely concentrated, they should never be used undiluted on the skin, even if you just want to add a few drops of essential oil to the bath, they need to be diluted first (check out How to Use Essential Oils in the Bath for full details).

The same principle goes for making bath salts, the essential oils must be diluted first. Adding them to salt is not enough because when you add the mix to the bath water, the salt ‘melts’, leaving undiluted essential oils floating on top of the bath water and in direct contact with your skin. So, first add the essential oils to a fatty base oil such as olive or almond oil, this can then be mixed in with the bath salts – when added to the bath the salt will melt and you will be left with essential oils dispersed in the base oil, which will give the added benefit of nourishing your skin*.

Bath Salt Recipe (the basic components that you can tweak to your taste):

  • Salt – 200 grams,
  • Base/Carrier Oil – 10 grams (or ml if simpler to measure) of any nut/seed/fruit oil e.g. almond/sunflower/olive oil,
  • Essential Oil – 5 drops (choose 1 or several essential oils to use but ensure the ‘total’ number of drops is 5).
    • pour the base oil into a jug, then add the drops of essential oil and stir,
    • pour the salt into a large bowl, add the blend of base and essential oil and mix thoroughly,
    • add a hand full of the salt mix to the bath, do so once the water is run and you are ready to step in (if you add it while the water is still running, the essential oils in the mix will evaporate with the steam).

Muscle Relaxing Bath Salt Recipe:

  • Epsom Salt** – 200 grams,
  • Oil – 10 grams – arnica (macerated in olive oil),
  • Essential Oil – 5 drops – lavender, black pepper &/or chamomile.

Skin Soothing Bath Salt Recipe:

  • Dead Sea Salt** – 200 grams,
  • Base Oil – 10 grams – calendula (macerated in olive oil), apricot &/or. camellia,
  • Essential Oil – 5 drops – chamomile, lavender &/or neroli (orange blossom).

Refreshing Bath Salt Recipe:

  • Salt (your choice, see below**) – 200 grams,
  • Oil – 10 grams – your choice eg. olive, almond, apricot oil,
  • Essential Oil – 5 drops – rosemary, mandarin &/or coriander seed.

Tip: If you want to add flowers & petals to your bath salts, (e.g. rose, lavender, chamomile) sprinkle a few spoonfuls into the mix, enough for your desired visual effect. Note, that it can make the bath more difficult to clean afterwards, so wrapping all the salts/flowers/oils into a muslin cloth and tying them up with string will mean you don’t need to collect all the petals after your bath.

* Caution, due to the base oil the bath can be slippery so be careful not to slip!

** Epsom Salt is more suitable for muscle aches & pains. Dead Sea Salt is more suitable for soothing the skin – I usually use a mix of both in my blends to get the benefits of both.

A Sniff About Airport Fragrance Halls

I usually take a walk around the perfume & beauty products when I’m in an airport, just to see what’s out there – it often makes me feel a little sick, not just the headiness & intensity of most of the fragrances, but the feel of the advertising & packaging. You get a sense of what’s behind the product, the intention to draw you in & make you feel like you need something to make you more sexy, desirable, attractive, younger, confident &/or cool… most of the models in the ads have a look of total emptiness, a dash of aloofness & there is more than a whiff of porn in many of them.
It actually feels totally disgusting to have that directed at me, and the layout of the airport means you can not escape passing by it.

Face rollers – apparently?

The product shown in the image here caught my attention and actually disturbed me as I realised we have come to a point where women are being marketed something that looks like a sex toy that we are supposed to roll our faces with.
I’ll let you feel into your own response to this but it’s worth being aware of the energy behind something we might buy, be that clothes, food, beauty products, anything, we are saying ‘yes’ to that product and supporting that business.

I wrote the following two blogs a while back on appreciating the quality we bring in the way we use skin care and beauty products, so even though we may not find many products on the market that offer something to truly honour how precious we are, we can bring it in the way we use it:

Nurture – Cherish – Adore  

Connection – Rituals – Nurturing

Digestive Massage with Essential Oils

Click image to enlarge.

Instructions for self digestive massage:

This is a treatment you can easily give yourself whenever you feel to. It can help with digestive problems such as IBS, bloating, constipation, general discomfort, loss of appetite and digestive anxiousness*.

You can use just olive oil, but if you would like essential oils to enhance the treatment then see the suggested blends below.

Lay down in a comfortable supported position. This is really important, you want to make sure you’re able to completely relax, it could be on your bed, sofa, a massage table or on the floor if you can support your body enough. Have a steady place ready for the oil to stand that you can reach and it’s not likely to be knocked over and wear clothes that can reveal your tummy area. You may need a towel under you incase the oil runs, blankets to keep you cosy and pillows or cushions to support your body (for your head or under knees).

Once you’re set, place one hand on your heart to help settle your body and use the other hand to massage the oil or ‘digestive blend’ around your tummy.  Do this in small, gentle, anti-clockwise circles, initially just to apply the oil. Then you will follow the route of your digestive system, which goes clockwise, but make your massage movements anti-clockwise… begin at the stomach, just under your ribcage, then around the centre of your tummy covering the ‘small intestine’ area, gradually move down towards the start of the ‘ascending colon’, follow this up the right side of your body, then across the body as it becomes the ‘transverse colon’ and finally to the ‘descending colon’ down the left side of your body. You may feel to repeat, to focus on certain areas and to take a moment to rest once complete.

I actually love doing this before I go to sleep at night and would love to be able to continue laying there until I fall asleep but I have to get up to wash the oil off my hands, especially if I’ve used an essential oil blend.

*The massage is a support, not a longterm cure for symptoms, but it can help relieve and clear in the moment. You should consult your doctor if symptoms persist.

Here are some blend suggestions, they are also available to purchase as a ‘Bespoke Blend’ designed for your personal situation:

Clearing digestive blend (strong):

Gentle digestive blend:

Anxiety digestive blend:

  • Olive oil, 10mls (you can use other nut, seed or fruit oils such as almond or apricot oil)
  • Lavender essential oil, 2 drops
  • Neroli essential oil, 2 drops
  • Can be used in pregnancy, with children and on sensitive or elderly skin, but only use 1 drop of each essential oil instead of 2).

Digestive massage and other treatments are available to book with me at Brighton & Hove Therapies in Brighton, UK. Please call to arrange: 07828954020.